Sacraments. Do we really know what their meanings are?

Sacraments. Do we really know what their meanings are?

What is the difference between the sacraments of the dead and the sacraments of the living?

The Basic

According to the Catholic Culture Dictionary, Sacraments are defined as, “Those sacraments which can be validly and fruitfully received when a person is not in the state of grace. They are baptism, penance, and, if needed, anointing of the sick. These sacraments confer or restore sanctifying grace and confer actual graces when received by one who is already in God’s friendship”.

Sacraments of the Dead

“Amen, amen, I say to thee, unless a man be born again of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God”. (John 3:5)
In death, we want to enter into God’s Kingdom. With Baptism and Penance, we are preparing our spirit to receive God’s blessing to achieve his approval. Therefore, they are called the Sacraments of the Dead

Sacraments of the living

Confirmation, Holy Eucharist, Anointing of the Sick, Holy Orders, and Matrimony are called sacraments of the living because their chief purpose is to give more grace to souls already spiritually alive through sanctifying grace.

Jesus Christ’s signs

Getting into Heaven is our goal, according to Matthew 6:25-33. One must have Sanctifying Grace in their soul when one dies to enter Heaven. Sanctifying Grace is God’s life in the soul and is chiefly obtained through the Seven Sacraments. A Sacrament is an outward sign made by Jesus Christ to give one grace. An outward sign is anything one can see, hear, or feel, which tells one about something one cannot see. Each Sacrament is a direct encounter with Christ, who is the One who really gives the Sacrament. Christ gave His Church only the essential parts of each Sacrament; the Church has surrounded each Sacrament with a ceremony.
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